PNG Reef Successfully Deployed

After many years of hard work and dedication, we have successfully deployed all 21 of the long-awaited reefs for coral restoration in Papua New Guinea! We are incredibly proud of the result of such diligence and generosity from our team and from all of our supporters around the world. We will continue to make strides towards building this project into a Global Force For Ocean Health™ — both across the globe and close to home for generations to come.

View Photo Gallery of the Making & Deployment of the Reef

Fish Reef Project Includes Somalia in TGAFR Efforts

Fish Reef Project is proud to include Somalia in its latest efforts to build the Great African Food Reef. We are working with local NGO partners to deploy the first 2000 reef units in Somalia. The cobalt blue waters off the Somali Coast, is home to amazing forms of marine life. Somalia is ready to move ahead and rebuild as they rise from the ashes of decades of civil War and Fish Reef Project is proud to be part of the reconstruction and peace making process.  Somali fishermen are looking forward to having new reefs closer to shore.

Much of the seafloor off Somalia is naked mud and sand; some of the natural reefs have been harmed by human activities.  By building new reefs and providing new structure, it will allow massive amounts of new coral, fish and lobster to thrive and provide food and income for Somalis.  In the past, some Somalis turned to piracy because fish stocks had been depleted from illegal fishing activities, hence it is everyone’s best interest to keep the reefs and fish stock healthy and able to support small scale sustainable fisheries.

Learn More about the Africa Reef Project here >

 

A fishermen tell Somali women that there is no more fish, at the Bossaso harbour in Puntland, Somalia. In the 23 years since Somalia descended into civil war, the country’s waters have been exploited by illegal fisheries, and the economic infrastructure that once provided jobs ravaged. Too often, there was simply no way for young men with limited educations to provide for themselves or their families, and many turned to piracy. Although piracy has decreased in recent years, unless young men in Somalia are provided with appealing livelihood opportunities, there is a chance that they could revert back to piracy. ADESO/ KAREL PRINSLOO.

 

A fishermen tell Somali women that there is no more fish, at the Bossaso harbour in Puntland, Somalia. In the 23 years since Somalia descended into civil war, the country’s waters have been exploited by illegal fisheries, and the economic infrastructure that once provided jobs ravaged. Too often, there was simply no way for young men with limited educations to provide for themselves or their families, and many turned to piracy. Although piracy has decreased in recent years, unless young men in Somalia are provided with appealing livelihood opportunities, there is a chance that they could revert back to piracy. ADESO/ KAREL PRINSLOO.

FRP Visits the African Union

FRP recently visited the African Union in Ethiopia and received substantial support for our continent-wide Great African Food Reef Project. This project will restore and enhance thousands of acres of ocean, feed and employ millions of Africans over time, while reducing pressure on natural reefs.

 

Here’s a few more photos from our recent trip to Africa

( Artist Rendition of the Great African Food Reef map )

 

Captain’s Log: Cachuma Lake Critters Get a Boost

Local Girl Scouts dive right into Fish Reef Project

Fis Reef Project and Girl Scouts at Goleta Lemon Festival. Click to view larger

Fish Reef Project and Girl Scouts at Goleta Lemon Festival. (Courtesy photo)

A boost for wildlife was deployed in Cachuma Lake over the weekend by Fish Reef Project (FRP), after a permitting process that involved the state of California, Santa Barbara County and the federal Bureau of Reclamation.

Two large Fish Reef units were deployed in an area where fish tend to congregate, and lake visitors like to go wet a line and enjoy the gorgeous county park. Trust me, if you are not a regular visitor to Cachuma Lake, you should be.

The project was a focus of a Fish Reef Project booth at the Goleta Lemon Festival recently, and a local Girl Scout troop provided the energy, enthusiasm and all-around support for the fish reef in Cachuma Lake and for a project to build a kelp restoration reef on the outer edge of Goleta Bay to restore a kelp forest that has been lost because of man’s activities, to provide Fish Reef unit habitat and homes for tonnage of fish, crustaceans and other sea life.

The reef unit that went into Cachuma Lake was quietly named Kaiden Vague Memorial Reef, after a local special-needs boy who lost his life in an accident earlier this year on his 16th birthday which he shared with his mom Tiffany.

Regulations preclude a plaque or other onsite memorialization, however the community knows the reef’s name.

The Girl Scouts were a collective bundle of positive enthusiasm, and the leadership of Paula Cassin and troop leader Lydia Swanson was amazing.

“I’m glad that we chose to help the Fish Reef project because the idea of putting something so useful in the water is great,” said Girl Scout Lilly Cassin, an eighth-grader at Goleta Valley Junior High.

Now that the fish reef is deployed, lake critters including fish will find it and benefit from it. This multi-agency cooperation with a nonprofit entity is heartening to see.

“The permitting process went smoothly, and I look forward to continued collaboration with the Bureau of Reclamation, the state of California and the county of Santa Barbara,” said Chris Goldblatt, Fish Reef project founder and executive director.

The other project (still in planning) that the Girl Scout Troop and much of the community supports is FRP’s Goleta Kelp Reef Project.

It is designed to restore a historical natural kelp bed, provide habitat for mega bio-tonnage of new sea life, help Goleta Beach with sand accretion and retention, and provide UCSB with 100 years of study opportunities and related funding.

Paula Cassin said she was happy she saw the public service announcement on TV and contacted Goldblatt at FRP because the project to restore the kelp forest, which no longer regenerated naturally, off Goleta Beach is a great example of an intervention that helps both nature and people.

Lilly Cassin said, “For our Girl Scout Silver Project we have to help the community in a way that is sustainable. It has to last. The Fish Reef units last hundreds of years.”

Another Girl Scout, Annika Wagner, an eighth-grader at Marymount of Santa Barbara said, “It’s a win-win project for everyone in our community.

“This reef means more kelp which will attract more fish and the reef will also help stop beach erosion. It will still be in place hundreds of years from now, which is pretty cool.”

— Capt. David Bacon operates WaveWalker Charters and is president of SOFTIN Inc., a nonprofit organization providing seafaring opportunities for those in need. Visit softininc.blogspot.com to learn more about the organization and how you can help. The opinions expressed are his own.

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